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SAMMY DAVIS, JR.! <br> Striking framed display featuring <br> a signed 1940s clipping, <br> 1964 Golden Boy program and 1957 LP Jacket

Offered here is a beautiful framed and matted autograph display for fans of the late, great Sammy Davis, Jr.

At the lower part of the display is an original album jacket of Sammy’s hard to find 1957 Reprise LP, “It’s All Over But the Swingin’,” which features a striking image of a painting showing Sammy on a park bench at night.

Directly above the album jacket is a rare copy of the original 1964 theatre program for “Golden Boy,” a broadway musical that Sammy starred in. The musical was based on the play by controversial and blacklisted playwright, Clifford Odets. The image on the program cover is a striking portrait of Sammy as the boxer, rendered by famed artist Leroy Neiman.

In the upper left portion of the display is a 1940s newspaper photograph of Sammy while he was in The Will Mastin Trio, a singing and dancing group that consisted of Sammy, Sammy’s father, and Sammy’s uncle (Will Mastin). This clipping bears the authentic autograph of Sammy Davis, Jr. himself.

The entire display is in excellent condition. The piece measures approximately 18 x 31”.

From the All Music Guide:
Recognized throughout much of his career as "the world's greatest living entertainer," Sammy Davis, Jr. was a remarkably popular and versatile performer equally adept at acting, singing, dancing and impersonations -- in short, a variety artist in the classic tradition. A member of the famed Rat Pack, he was among the very first African-American talents to find favor with audiences on both sides of the color barrier, and remains a perennial icon of cool. Born in Harlem on December 8, 1925, Davis made his stage debut at the age of three performing with Holiday in Dixieland, a black vaudeville troupe featuring his father and helmed by his de facto uncle, Will Mastin; dubbed "Silent Sam, the Dancing Midget," he proved phenomenally popular with audiences and the act was soon renamed Will Mastin's Gang Featuring Little Sammy. At the age of seven Davis made his film debut in the legendary musical short Rufus Jones for President, and later received tap-dancing lessons courtesy of the great Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. In 1941, the Mastin Gang opened for Tommy Dorsey at Detroit's Michigan Theater; there Davis first met Dorsey vocalist Frank Sinatra -- the beginning of a lifelong friendship.


samdavjrsig1Regular price: $600.00Sale price: $350.00

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